Tag Archives: Middle English

Hoyt Duggan festschrift

I reviewed the festschrift for Hoyt Duggan in Yearbook of Langland Studies 27 (2013). The full citation for the book is Michael Calabrese and Stephen H. A. Shepherd, eds., Yee? Baw for Bokes: Essays on Medieval Manuscripts and Poetics in … Continue reading

Posted in Publications, Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on Hoyt Duggan festschrift

Kalamazoo 2014: two sessions

I am organizing two sessions on Piers Plowman at the 2014 International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo: “Langland’s Line” and “Piers Plowman and the Rich.” The first session concerns the poem’s meter; the second, the poem’s intersections with social history. … Continue reading

Posted in cfp, Conference | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Kalamazoo 2014: two sessions

Boethius at MLA

[I thank the panelists for their paper proposals and interest in this session. Eleanor Johnson and Linda Shenk are authors of recent books bearing on the session topic: respectively, Practicing Literary Theory in the Middle Ages: Ethics and the Mixed … Continue reading

Posted in Conference | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Boethius at MLA

Literary Approaches to the Past: ENGL 179 F13

course description (with Eric Weiskott): Organized around the theme of the distant past, this course makes a study of selected works of medieval, early modern, and modern literature. We read four pairs of texts, selected to illustrate contrasting approaches to … Continue reading

Posted in Course description | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Literary Approaches to the Past: ENGL 179 F13

Readings in Middle English: ENGL 158 S14

Course description: What did English literature look like before the Canterbury Tales? In this course we study the language and forms of literature in English, from the middle of the twelfth century to the beginning of the fifteenth—-a period of … Continue reading

Posted in Course description | Tagged , | Comments Off on Readings in Middle English: ENGL 158 S14

Alliterative Revival: Retrospect and Prospect

An excerpt from my review essay, “Alliterative Revival: Retrospect and Prospect.” In this review of Randy Schiff’s Revivalist Fantasy: Alliterative Verse and Nationalist Literary History (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2011), I attempted to sketch out the main lines of … Continue reading

Posted in Publications, Reviews | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Alliterative Revival: Retrospect and Prospect

The Prick of Conscience: a new edition

An excerpt from my forthcoming review of Prik of Conscience, ed. by James H. Morey, TEAMS Middle English Text Series (Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 2012). The full text of this review will appear in the Journal of English and Germanic Philology. … Continue reading

Posted in Publications, Reviews | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on The Prick of Conscience: a new edition

Trilingual England: ENGL 567 F10

This course was a survey of Late Middle English literature, focalized around issues of language choice and language contact. We studied the shifting status, functions, and interactions of Latin, French, and English in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century England, and the strategies … Continue reading

Posted in Course description | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Trilingual England: ENGL 567 F10

scribal habitus and usus scribendi

Here I post the opening frame for a paper I read at the Fifth International Conference on Piers Plowman, held in Oxford, in May 2011. The paper was titled, “Scribal habitus and usus scribendi: or, observations on an alliterative formula.” … Continue reading

Posted in Conference | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on scribal habitus and usus scribendi

Walter Ong, Rhetoric, and Alliterative Verse

The opening frame for a paper I presented in the session “Technologies of Writing: After Ong”, at the 2012 meeting of the Medieval Academy of America, held at St. Louis University. The paper was an exposition of the Latin grammatical and … Continue reading

Posted in Conference | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on Walter Ong, Rhetoric, and Alliterative Verse